Ultimate 2020 Masters betting guide: Best bets, capsules on every golfer

By VSiN Staff  (VSiN.com) 

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The 2020 Masters will be a tournament unlike any other, as it was postponed from its usual April date to November. How will weather impact the tournament? Which golfers are in form? Which players offer the best betting value.

Our mega tournament preview from Brady Kannon, Wes Reynolds, Jeff Sealey, Matt Youmans gives their best value bets, matchups they like and a breakdown for every player in the field.

Enjoy!

Best value bets to win

Jon Rahm (11-1)

Reynolds: Going into 2020, he was my pick to win the Masters in April. Now the Masters is in November this year, but I have no reason to not consider him the man to beat. The World No.2 has the game to win here. He is both long and accurate off the tee and ranked 2nd in Total Driving on the PGA Tour this past season. The Spaniard can not only take advantage of the Par 5s with his length, but also has the scrambling and lag putting skills to succeed on these slick and fast Bentgrass greens. 

Last time out, Rahm was second in SG: Tee-To-Green in his runner-up finish in the Zozo Championship at Sherwood. The approach game ranked 6th in the field in that event as well. Rahm's middle irons are really the one area where he can improve, but if they are on the level they were at Sherwood three weeks ago, then he's going to be right there for the win because the other aspects of his game are consistently top-notch.

He is one of a select few (DeChambeau, Thomas, D. Johnson, Morikawa) to win multiple events this summer. Rahm dominated at the Memorial Tournament, which has obvious correlations to Augusta National. He also won in a playoff at the BMW Championship over World No. 1 Dustin Johnson, so despite still looking for his first major, he is a proven player for big events in pressure situations against the world's best. 

Rahm will also be paired with tournament favorite Bryson DeChambeau on Thursday and Friday, which could work out for both good and bad, but I'm going to lean on the good because that gives him even that slightly extra motivation to take down the man that everyone seems to already be fitting for the green jacket. Rahm just turned 26 on Tuesday so a new jacket would be just the perfect birthday present to himself. 

Rory McIlroy (12-1)

As ridiculous as it sounds, McIlroy just might be under the radar this week in spite of being his usual short price. All the pre-tournament buzz is around DeChambeau, World No. 1 Dustin Johnson and a returning Brooks Koepka, and then there's Rory, who is looking to complete the career Grand Slam.

If this event were played in its customary spot in April earlier this year, McIlroy would have had all eyes on him as the favorite as he was the No. 1 ranked player in the world before COVID-19. The pressure of being No. 1 and trying to complete the career Slam could have been too much. Originally I was not looking Rory's way, but the fact that he is not the talk of the golf media at Augusta National makes me like him more this week. Now he doesn't have the biggest target on his back and he's also a recent first-time father so he is likely in a better place mentally. 

Rory is the only player in the Top 12 on the odds board without a Top 5 finish since the June restart, but there are signs of a potential peak here this week. Last time out, he only finished 17th at the Zozo, but came back from a bad opening round of 73 and gained almost eight shots on the field tee-to-green over the last three rounds and around four and a half shots on the field just on approach shots.

Furthermore, Rory has always thrived more than anyone over the years on soft course conditions.

Justin Thomas (13-1)

Youmans: My plan was to avoid the top five to 10 favorites in this tournament and shoot solely for long shots, but I frequently bet on Thomas and can’t resist the temptation this week with wet weather in the forecast. The conditions should favor longer hitters and precision iron players, a profile that fits Thomas like a glove. He recorded top-20 finishes the past two years at Augusta. When he’s on his game, he’s arguably the best all-around player in the world. I expect him to be near the top of the leaderboard on Saturday and Sunday.

Xander Schauffele (17-1)

Youmans: It could be said this has been a disappointing year for Schauffele, but that’s only because he has failed to win. He has been one of the most consistent players in the world and in the hunt almost every week.

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He finished 2020 ranked third in Strokes Gained: Total. Schauffele posted the lowest score in the Tour Championship at Atlanta in early September, but the starting-strokes scoring system gave Dustin Johnson a big head start en route to the win. Schauffele, Johnson and Brooks Koepka tied for second, one stroke behind Tiger Woods, in last year’s Masters; Schauffele went 65-70-68 in the final three rounds. Unfortunately, Schauffele has become so popular that his odds value is disappearing, but he and Thomas are the two favorites I still like to play.

Tony Finau (38-1)

Youmans: Why pick a player who seems to never win? Finau has been so close so many times in the past two years, and maybe his breakthrough is coming in this major. The first two major winners in 2020 were first-timers (Collin Morikawa, PGA Championship; Bryson DeChambeau, U.S. Open). Finau has the length off the tee and the talent to win at Augusta, where experience matters. The arrows are pointing up on his current form and course form. He recorded a Top 25 finish Sunday at the Houston Open and tied for 11th in an elite field at the Zozo Championship in California in late October. He tied for fifth, two strokes behind Tiger Woods, in last year’s Masters. Finau actually has won on the PGA Tour, but it was back in March 2016 at the Puerto Rico Open. I’m looking for longer shots and odds value, so I bet Finau at 46-1 when he was playing well at the Zozo.

Bubba Watson (40-1)

Reynolds: With all of the shorter prices having never won here at Augusta, it seems fitting to at least add one player who has, twice in fact. 

Watson has finishes of 5th and 12th in the last two years at the Masters when he was nowhere close to any sort of good form. This year he is in great form with back-to-back Top 10s at Shadow Creek and Sherwood. 

Bubba has also ranked in the Top 10 for Greens In Regulation is five of his last six events. He can also roll putts on these Bentgrass greens as eight of his 12 career PGA Tour victories, including two here, have come on this surface.

 

Youmans: I bet on Bubba in both of his Masters wins in 2012 and 2014, and bettors like to back players who have paid off in the past. Last year at Augusta, Watson finished five strokes off the lead in a tie for 12th. In late October at the Zozo Championship, he went 19 under par and tied for fourth. My golf handicapping focus is on current form and course form, and Bubba checks both boxes this week. I took 45-1 odds on Watson last month, and this is a long-shot play that makes sense at 35-1 or higher.

Matthew Wolff (50-1)

 

Reynolds: Like a couple of these other selections, I bet Wolff several weeks ago in anticipation of the number dropping but he has stayed in this price range. 

A debutant has not won here at Augusta National since Fuzzy Zoeller accomplished the feat in 1979. However, Wolff has finished 4th (PGA) and 2nd (U.S. Open) in the first two majors of his career.

 

Adam Scott (70-1)

Reynolds: His price is currently drifting upwards due to not having played many events, but the former Masters champion is an experienced hand that can go well here despite not having strong lead-in form. 

Scott also has the longest consecutive streak of made cuts here at Augusta National with 10. 

 

Youmans: Scott’s only major win came at the Masters seven years ago, when I bet on him. I have not bet on him much in recent years, but his odds are high enough to see a buy sign again. His positive history at Augusta goes beyond that one win -- a top-20 finish in 2019, a tie for 32nd (with Tiger Woods) in 2018 and a Top 10 in 2017. Scott’s steady track record should lead to a good run for the money.

Cameron Smith (125-1)

 

Reynolds: Smith is a bit of an unknown commodity to casual golf bettors but he has gone well at Augusta before with a T-5 in 2018. 

The Australian is peaking at the right time with a finish of 11th at Shadow Creek and a fourth at Sherwood leading into Augusta.

 

Matchups 

Thomas (-103) over McIlroy

Youmans: Thomas is a long driver, so he’s not losing much ground to McIlroy off the tee, and he’s a better iron player and putter. JT’s results at Augusta have steadily improved, showing he has learned how to play the course. Last year, he went 73-68-69-70 to finish in a tie for 12th, three strokes ahead of McIlroy, who has not won a major since 2014. I rate Thomas as the second-best player in the field this week (behind Dustin Johnson), but McIlroy is -117 in this matchup at Circa Sports. Thomas has been a far more consistent player all year.

Dustin Johnson to finish in Top 10: Yes -110

Youmans: DJ has two straight Top 10s at Augusta, including a tie for second last year, and his current form is outstanding. With the media hype focused on Bryson DeChambeau, Johnson is flying a little under the radar -- and that’s a positive. 

Jason Kokrak -177 over Francisco Molinari

Sealey: While this is a big price to lay, Molinari hasn’t been the same since last year’s Masters and Kokrak is on fire.

Jason Kokrak -115 over Shane Lowry

Sealey: This is a form/price play here.  Kokrak’s form couldn’t be better and Lowry has struggled some.

Jason Day -131 over Tiger Woods

Sealey: As long as Day finishes the tournament, he will win this matchup.  Tiger looks lost.

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Kannon:

Bernhard Langer (-130) over Sung Kang

Lanto Griffin (-150) over Henrik Stenson

Jon Rahm (-135) over Bryson DeChambeau

Jason Kokrak (-140) over Gary Woodland

Lanto Griffin ( 115) over Billy Horschel

Kannon: I am often asked the question, "What is your favorite golf major?" My response is always that if you ask me in April, it’s The Masters, but ask me later on in the year and it’s the British Open. Well, in 2020, I guess it’s The Masters because The Open Championship was cancelled.

I don’t have the same excitement, anticipation, and overall giddiness that I normally would because we are not ushering in springtime, and celebrating the beauty of Augusta National Golf. The tradition unlike any other feels different -- and the course is going to play differently, too.

The temperatures in Augusta, Georgia this week will be very April-like, if not warmer. High 70's, low 80's is what the forecast is calling for -- along with quite a bit of rain. Augusta National Golf Club normally shuts down for the summer and reopens to the membership in October. In September, the maintenance practice of overseeding is performed. The Bermuda grass fairways are scalped down and winter rye grass seed is applied to all of the fairways and rough areas. The bent grass greens, by the way, are not affected as bent grass is not a turf that needs to be overseeded. The putting surfaces should be very similar to what we see in the traditional April slot.

The rye grass is not afforded the same amount of time to mature and take hold in Nov., so the fairways and collection areas around the greens won't be as tight, manicured, like a carpet. They will be thinner, more wispy, and still have remnants of the Bermuda base playing a factor. With the thundershowers in the forecast, the players will be hitting shots off of a very wet, soft (possibly even muddy) surface.

Still, Augusta National has the most extensive, multi-million dollar underground golf course maintenance system in the world and can tweak Mother Nature miraculously, so maybe we get a product somewhere in between what we normally see in April and the aforementioned immature fairways.

I believe you still have to handicap The Masters as you always would, focusing on the same areas, which for me are; Strokes Gained: Off The Tee, Strokes Gained: Approach, Par 5 Scoring, Scrambling and Bogey Avoidance. However, I believe with the change in season and/or course conditions, emphasis probably needs to be placed more so on iron play (SG: Approach) and Scrambling. The shots around the greens are going to be a bit different and players will need to adjust. So much talk has been made about length off of the tee, specifically Bryson DeChambeau, and while I believe this gives DeChambeau an advantage and that length is always a key factor at Augusta, iron play, wedge play, and scrambling around the greens may be a more important skill set this particular week in determining a winner.

Experience always goes a long way at Augusta. It takes at least a few laps around this track before most players go on to win. Experience this year, with the different conditions, may be more important than ever. However, for the first timers or the debutants, don't be surprised if some fare very well because they obviously don't know the course any other way that what is right in front of them.

Here are a few selections I like:

Outright Winner 

Jon Rahm (15-1)

Dustin Johnson (20-1)

Patrick Cantlay (35-1)

Hideki Matsuyama (40-1)

Bubba Watson (45-1)

Adam Scott (45-1)

Scottie Scheffler (80-1)

Sealey: I’m going to walk through some of my thought process in building out my model in the early stages, look at a few fades, a good value, and some matchups for The Masters.

What do golfers need to win at Augusta?  First, they have to be able to score on Par 5’s.  That may be obvious, but it’s absolutely critical here. The Par 5’s have an average birdie rate of 36% and you must birdie them. If a golfer could birdie all of the Par 5’s for four days and play the rest of the course at even par, he’ll likely be wearing a green jacket on Sunday.

However, that is easier said than done.  There are seven holes here with a bogey rate of over 25% and four more with a bogey rate of over 20%.  In other words, bogey avoidance maybe even more important than making birdies.

So when building my model, the first two areas that I look at are Par 5 scoring and bogey avoidance.  I built a super simple model and looked at who has been the best in their last 24 rounds evenly weighing Par 5 scoring and Bogey Avoidance.  The top five were Dustin Johnson, John Rahm, Xander Schauffele, Justin Reed, and Louis Oosthuizen.

Then I took the same simple model and applied it to the field’s last 24 rounds at Augusta (some haven’t yet played 24 rounds there, but used what they had played).  The top five were Jordan Spieth, Rickie Fowler, Jon Rahm, Rory McIlroy, and DJ. 

It’s pretty easy to see why DJ and Rahm are among the favorites to win the Masters and if you’re looking for someone other than Bryson to back, those are the next logical pivots.

The winning score is usually in the -10 to -15 range, but I expect it to be at least -15 this year and we may even see someone surpass Jordan Spieth’s -18 of 2015.  A 64 (-8) is about the lowest round you can expect to see at Augusta.  This was accomplished last year by one of my favorites, Webb Simpson, as well as Tony Finau.

The wild-card golfers that I am avoiding this Masters are Jordan Spieth, Fowler, and Phil Mickelson. 

Fowler has been the popular pick in the 20-to-40-1 range for as long as I can remember.  His “best player to never win a major” take has started to fade and now you can find Fowler at 70-1, almost double the price of Matthew Wolff and Colin Morikawa.  If you’re still a believer, my simple model supports you … maybe this is the year?

As far as Spieth, I don’t know if there’s a more fascinating player.  His course history at Augusta speaks for itself but his strokes gained off-the-tee stats have been flat awful.  He has lost strokes off the tee in nine straight tournaments and has two Top 10’s in his past 22 starts.  If there is ever a course for Spieth to “get right” it’s Augusta, but I’m passing on his this year.

Phil has won two of his last three tournament … on the Champions Tour.  Expecting any sort of real performance out of Phil here just isn’t realistic.

Currently available at Circa Sports at 43-1 is Bubba Watson.  Bubba can definitely score on the Par 5’s here and already has two green jackets.  His current form is tremendous and for a guy who I think will be very popular in the betting community by the time this event tees off, this price is a tremendous value.  His matchup pricing is not as strong. 

Capsules for every player in the 2020 Masters

​Reynolds: Here are capsules for all 93 players in the Masters field and their odds to win at Circa Sports.

Bryson DeChambeau (9-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 3/3

Best Career Finish: T-21 (2016) low amateur

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 1

DeChambeau was 37-1 in March to win the Masters but is the co-favorite this week. He has two wins in 2020, including his first major at the U.S. Open, winning by six shots at Winged Foot. He has five other top-10s since the restart in June. He proved cynics wrong by being able to “bomb and gouge” around Winged Foot, but I will be cynical here again at Augusta. The price is way too short, considering that he was 25-1 for the U.S. Open just two months ago. He leads the world in driving distance, and length off the tee is never necessarily a disadvantage, but it will provide some awkward yardages for approaches and short pitch shots, which have been a weakness in DeChambeau’s game. While he is clearly a different player from previous years, DeChambeau has broken 70 only once in 12 career rounds at Augusta National.

Rory McIlroy (9-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 11/10

Best Career Finish: 4th (2015)

Top 5s: 2

Top 10s: 5

Top 25s: 9

McIlroy has failed to win in 2020, which is why he has dropped to No. 5 in the world after he was No. 1 at the beginning of the June restart. This is the one major that keeps him from completing the career Grand Slam. It has been over six years since McIlroy has won his last major, the 2014 PGA. He has shown signs of better play lately and is always at or near the top for strokes gained off the tee, having led the field at the U.S. Open and CJ Cup. But the approach game has been in and out, and he has not knocked on the door for a win since February. If his price had drifted up to the middle or high teens, he would be worth a look, but 9-1 is too short. 

Dustin Johnson (11-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 9/8

Best Career Finish: T-2 (2019)

Top 5s: 2

Top 10s: 4

Top 25s: 5

Johnson has won twice this summer, at the Travelers Championship and the Northern Trust, while also winning the FedEx Cup and cementing himself as No. 1 in the Official World Golf Ranking. He has finished sixth or better in each of his last six starts, including the Northern Trust win and three runners-up — T-2 PGA, 2nd BMW Championship and T-2 last week in Houston. Nevertheless, 2020 has not been without adversity. He tested positive for COVID-19 and had to miss starts at Shadow Creek, where he owns the course record, and Sherwood, where he and father-in-law Wayne Gretzky are members. That forced him to spend nearly two weeks quarantined in a hotel room. Those circumstances prompted him to play the Houston Open last weekend. His situation heading into the Masters is not ideal, but arguably no player in the world is in better form right now. The 2016 U.S. Open champion came close last year with a T-2 finish at Augusta and has four top-10 finishes in the last five years here. He missed 2017 with an injury when he was the pre-tournament favorite. Johnson probably should be the favorite here over DeChambeau and McIlroy. 

Jon Rahm (13-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 3/3

Best Career Finish: 4th (2018)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 2

Top 25s: 2

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Rahm was my preseason pick to win the Masters, and I bet him accordingly. The world No. 2 has won twice since the restart, with a romp over the field at the Memorial Tournament and by dropping a 66-foot double-breaker putt to vanquish Dustin Johnson in a playoff to win the BMW Championship. His only missed cut in 2020 was in the first event back at Colonial. Rahm has five worldwide victories, five runners-up and three thirds in the last 16 months. He is one of the select few who is a legitimate threat to win every time he tees it up. He has been in the top 10 the last two trips to Augusta and is a very good look to win here. At 25, he already has 12 professional worldwide wins. 

Justin Thomas (14-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 4/4

Best Career Finish: T-12 (2019)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 3

The 2017 PGA champion is ranked No. 3 in the world and has two victories in 2020. He took the opener at Kapalua in a playoff over Patrick Reed and Xander Schauffele and won the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational. He almost had a third but blew a late lead at the Workday Charity Open and lost in a playoff to Collin Morikawa. Thomas has never contended at Augusta, but his form has gotten progressively better in each appearance with a line of 39-22-17-12. He and Morikawa regularly battle for who is the best with the irons on the PGA Tour. If Thomas can hit more fairways, which he failed to do in a T-8 finish at the U.S. Open, he is easily one of the players to beat this week. Thomas comes in having finished T-2 along with Rahm at Sherwood, so the form looks to be in tip-top shape. 

Brooks Koepka (17-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 4/4

Best Career Finish: T-2 (2019)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 1

Top 25s: 3

Koepka has not won since August and has garnered only two top-5s but has missed extended time with knee and hip injuries. He clearly felt that winning another major this summer at the PGA was a foregone conclusion, but his Sunday round of 74 tied for second worst in the field and plummeted him to a T-29 finish. Koepka missed nine weeks after the Wyndham, including the U.S. Open, but returned at Shadow Creek (T-28) and finished T-5 last week in the tune-up at Houston. He has been in this position before, defending his U.S. Open title in 2018 in just his fifth start after yet another injury. Last year was his first time really contending at Augusta with a second-place finish, so he certainly can do well here. But the iron play needs to improve. 

Xander Schauffele (17-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 2/2

Best Career Finish: T-2 (2019)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 1

Top 25s: 1

Schauffele has finished third or better in three of the last eight majors, including a T-2 here last year. This summer he finished T-10 at the PGA and fifth at the U.S. Open. But he has been unable to win as frequently as a player at his level should. His last win was at the opening event in 2019 at Kapalua. Since then he has garnered five runner-up finishes at the Masters, Tour Championship, WGC-HSBC Champions, 2020 Sentry Tournament of Champions and CJ Cup at Shadow Creek. Even when he finished first, as he did as the low 72-hole scorer at the Tour Championship in August, he did not go home with any hardware because the FedEx Cup champion, Dustin Johnson, automatically won the Tour Championship due to the staggered scoring format. Schauffele’s game is in good shape, though, considering he has finished no worse than 25th in his last 11 events, including three top-5s and five top-10s. It is a matter of when, not if, for Schauffele’s first major championship. 

Tiger Woods (27-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 22/21

Best Career Finish: 1st (1997, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2019)

Top 5s: 12

Top 10s: 14

Top 25s: 18

Woods has teed it up only six times since the restart, and his best finish in those six events is a T-37 at the PGA. At 44 and with his track record, the Masters will continue to be the major each year that Woods is most likely to win. He has played at Augusta 22 times and finished fifth or better on 12 occasions. He has not missed a cut here since 1996, the only time that happened to him at Augusta. Woods is always lurking here and did exactly that last year before a birdie at No. 15 gave him the lead for good when many of the world’s best were in contention. Nevertheless, he just finished 72nd at Sherwood, a course where he has won five times, and his game looks nowhere near in the shape it needs to be to contend this week. Woods will always take money in majors, especially the Masters, which is why his price is still in this range when it probably should be at least double.

Patrick Cantlay (28-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 3/2

Best Career Finish: T-9 (2019)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 1

Top 25s: 1

Cantlay got his first experience at leading a major championship on Sunday right here last year with an eagle on the 15th. However, that was uncharted territory for him, and he drove it into the trees at No. 16, where a bogey took him out of contention and led to an eventual T-9 finish. Cantlay did not let that experience get him down, as 2019 proved to be the best season of his young career with a win at the Memorial Tournament as well as two runners-up (Shriners Hospitals for Children Open and BMW Championship) and two thirds (RBC Heritage and PGA Championship). Last year he cemented himself as a top-10 player in the world, and he currently sits at No. 10. He was slow out of the gate during the restart but won the Zozo Championship at Sherwood three weeks ago, holding off Jon Rahm and Justin Thomas. Cantlay looks like he is here to stay as a major championship contender due to his stellar short game, but the ball striking could use improvement. However, he has already won on a similar course at Muirfield Village and should be a factor. 

Patrick Reed (30-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 6/4

Best Career Finish: 1st (2018)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 1

Top 25s: 2

Reed’s victory in February at the WGC Mexico propelled him to his highest OWGR at No. 7, but he has fallen to No. 11 with some up-and-down play since the restart. Reed’s 2018 Masters victory did not exactly come out of nowhere, considering he finished T-2 at the previous major, the 2017 PGA, but he had never even finished in the top 20 in four previous appearances at Augusta. He also finished a disappointing T-36 in his defense last year. The short game carried him through two rounds at this year’s U.S. Open, but the tee-to-green game was not nearly good enough and he fell to a disappointing 13th. Very few players can make big putts in big moments like Reed, and he is certainly capable of winning on this stage again, but he will have to hit the ball much better to gain a second green jacket. 

Hideki Matsuyama (34-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 8/7

Best Career Finish: 5th (2015)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 2

Top 25s: 4

Matsuyama is on a winless streak dating to August 2017 from his last victory at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational. After his runner-up finish in the 2017 U.S. Open at Erin Hills, he was ranked No. 2 in the world. However, he now sits just inside the OWGR top 20 at No. 18. His ball striking has continued to be among the world’s best, but the putter has held him back. That seemingly turned the corner a bit as he equaled the course record of 63 at the Players Championship and held a two-shot lead after Round 1 before the event was canceled due to COVID-19. Bentgrass greens seem to be his preferred surface, and he putts better on faster greens like he will see this week. Matsuyama has finished sixth or better in all four majors. He does not get into the winner’s circle nearly as often as he should for a player of his caliber, but he has a good track record here and comes in off a runner-up finish in Houston. 

Tyrrell Hatton (34-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 3/2

Best Career Finish: T-44 (2018)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

The Englishman’s momentum looked to have come to a screeching halt with the stoppage in play, as Hatton was arguably one of the hottest players at the time. He had won twice in four months with victories at the Turkish Airlines Open and his first PGA Tour win at the Arnold Palmer Invitational. Hatton failed to make either major cut this summer, but a win at the BMW PGA Championship launched him into the OWGR top-10 for the first time in his career, and he now owns a career-high ranking of No. 9. He is a highly unproven product at Augusta but does have top-10 finishes in every other major. Despite the missed cuts this summer, Hatton is a bona fide elite contender with the way he is striking and putting the ball. After his win several weeks ago at Wentworth, he has posted two top-10s in his last three events, so he is right on form for a potential breakthrough in a major.  

Tony Finau (40-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 2/2

Best Career Finish: T-5 (2019)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 2

Top 25s: 2

Many bettors are likely losing patience with Finau, considering he is the ultimate come-close player and has not won since the 2016 Puerto Rico Open. He has seven top-10s in his last 10 majors, including a T-4 at the PGA and a T-8 in the U.S. Open this summer. He does not have a particular weakness, but all aspects of his game never seem to fire at the same time. Either he is great around the greens and the ball striking is not up to snuff, or the tee-to-green game is impeccable and he cannot make a putt. Nonetheless, Finau has finished 10th and fifth in his two appearances at Augusta National. Eventually, he will end this jinx and win. It seems like that win is not coming at a boilerplate PGA Tour event but instead on a bigger stage, and there is no bigger stage than the Masters. 

Bubba Watson (40-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 11/10

Best Career Finish: 1st (2012, 2014)

Top 5s: 3

Top 10s: 3

Top 25s: 5

Watson’s wins often seem to come out of nowhere, so it is a bit abnormal to see him come into Augusta with back-to-back top-10s at Shadow Creek and Sherwood. The big numbers in the market have been gobbled up, but he is still at a solid price. He is hitting the ball better than he has in a long time, and his ability to shape shots always makes him live to win at Augusta. Watson has finished fifth and 12th over the last two years and is closer to his early to mid-2010s form here. Bettors ignore him at their peril. 

Webb Simpson (40-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 8/5

Best Career Finish: T-5 (2019)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 1

Top 25s: 2

Simpson is a two-time winner on the PGA Tour this season, taking the Phoenix Open and the RBC Heritage. While he has never really been a regular contender here, Simpson did post his first top-5 at a major since his victory at the 2012 U.S. Open when he finished T-5 at last year’s Masters. Simpson’s primary exemption into this field is his 2018 victory at the Players Championship. Augusta really does not seem to be his best fit, and the ball striking has shown some slippage of late. Simpson has finished in the top 20 in seven of his last eight events but will need to show more to contend here.

Jason Day (40-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 9/8

Best Career Finish: T-2 (2011)

Top 5s: 3

Top 10s: 4

Top 25s: 7

Injuries and constant swing changes have continued to thwart Day, who has had a topsy-turvy 2020 (haven’t we all?). He missed three of his first four cuts on the restart before posting seven straight top-7 finishes, including a T-4 at the PGA. Just when it looked like he was returning to top-level form, his game fell off again. He missed a couple of cuts and did not post a finish better than T-38 at the U.S. Open over his next six events. He was on the first page of the leaderboard heading into Sunday at the CJ Cup before withdrawing early in the final round with a neck injury. Day was in contention last week at Houston before falling off early Sunday and finishing T-7. Day is the ultimate risk-reward player in this field. He certainly has proven that he can contend here and has an outstanding long-term record, but he is also a risk to withdraw at any time due to injury. 

Collin Morikawa (40-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

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Morikawa is only 23 and already has a major championship trophy on his mantel, having won the PGA Championship at Harding Park this summer. He had already earned a spot in the Masters field by being in the OWGR top 50 before the March cutoff. Morikawa is up there with the best of the best in terms of his pinpoint iron play. Nevertheless, he is still a young player, and immediate follow-up success has not happened in the subsequent months. His most recent form might not point to Morikawa here, but he did win this summer at the Workday Charity Open at Muirfield Village, which has similar greens to Augusta. That should be a welcome sight to a player who can still be a little shaky with his putter. 

Matthew Wolff (50-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: 1st Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Wolff turned 21 this year, but 2019 was a magical year for him. He not only won the NCAA Division I championship, he also won the 3M Open on the PGA Tour to earn a two-year exemption when he had zero status and was playing on sponsor exemptions. Wolff became the third player in history to win the NCAA title and a PGA Tour event in the same year, joining Tiger Woods and Ben Crenshaw. After his win last season in Minneapolis, he really did not show much for the better part of a year until a runner-up in Detroit this summer. Wolff posted another runner-up at the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open, but the 2020 highlights are finishing T-4 at the PGA and runner-up at the U.S. Open, where he was the 54-hole leader. That is not bad for a player in his first two appearances in majors. The ability is clearly there, but this is the first trek around Augusta, and no first-timer has won here since Fuzzy Zoeller in 1979.

Tommy Fleetwood (60-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 3/2

Best Career Finish: T-17 (2018)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 1

Fleetwood’s worldwide cut streak was snapped at 48 at the Arnold Palmer Invitational in March. Last year was supposed to be the year he cemented himself as one of the game’s true stars, and 2019 was not a bad year for Fleetwood. He finished second in the British Open at Royal Portrush and won in November at the Nedbank Golf Challenge in South Africa. He has posted a couple of higher finishes on the European Tour, taking second at the Scottish Open and third at the Portugal Masters against weaker fields, but a return to form might not be far away. 

Adam Scott (60-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 18/16

Best Career Finish: 1st (2013)

Top 5s: 2

Top 10s: 5

Top 25s: 10

Scott won twice in four starts with a victory in December in his homeland at the Australian PGA Championship. He followed with a triumph in his first start of 2020 at the Genesis Invitational. He moved back into the OWGR top 10 for the first time since 2016, but the stoppage in play halted any momentum, and he has been a lot less active during the pandemic, playing only five events since June. Scott is a former champion here and has nine career top-5s in majors and 19 top-10s. He turned 40 in July, so majors are the absolute and only priority at this stage. Due to the inactivity, the price has drifted upward to 60-1, which is a big number for a player with a stellar record here and not that far from potentially reaching top form again.

Justin Rose (60-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 14/13

Best Career Finish: 2nd (2017), T-2 (2015)

Top 5s: 3

Top 10s: 5

Top 25s: 11

Rose’s last win was over a year and a half ago at the 2019 Farmers Insurance Open. He qualified into this field with his T-3 finish at the 2019 U.S. Open. Rose has a top-4 finish or better in a major in four of the last five seasons. Nevertheless, he has fallen to 28th in the world, his lowest since 2010. He had never missed the cut at Augusta National until last year. Rose was in the mix for a long time at the PGA before finishing ninth, but he missed the cut at the U.S. Open. He split from coach Sean Foley this year and has changed equipment. Rose is still an outstanding driver and has always been good at hitting greens in regulation here, so a return to that form would not be shocking. But he is far from his best. 

Rickie Fowler (60-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 9/8

Best Career Finish: 2nd (2018)

Top 5s: 2

Top 10s: 3

Top 25s: 5

In late 2019, Fowler fell out of the world top 20 for the first time since 2014. Fowler is now at his lowest ranking since 2013 at No. 46. This looked like a year when he would take his next step and finally nab that elusive first major. It still could be, but he has shown a lack of consistency and is not regularly contending for victories in standard tournaments, let alone majors. His T-5 finish in a 34-player field at Kapalua to begin 2020 was his first top-5 since the Wells Fargo in May 2019. Fowler is in this field by finishing in the top 12 last year at Augusta. He has top-3 finishes in every major, so he has been close, but his supporters are starting to wonder whether he will win a major. Those worries seem premature considering he is only 31. However, he is working through a lot of swing changes under new coach John Tillery, and his putting, long the strength of his game, has slipped. Nevertheless, he is historically a great putter at Augusta National. 

Scottie Scheffler (60-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Scheffler is one of the multitude of young players who looks destined for stardom. He led the points list on the 2019 Korn Ferry Tour for the regular season and the finals events and garnered two victories to win the tour’s player of the year and earn fully exempt status in his rookie season on the PGA Tour. Scheffler has four top-10 finishes in 2020 that helped him earn 2019-20 PGA Tour Rookie of the Year honors. This will be his first appearance at Augusta, but he was the low amateur at the 2017 U.S. Open at Erin Hills (T-27). Scheffler also made a nice showing at the PGA, playing in Sunday’s final group with Dustin Johnson and ending up T-4 in his first of likely many times contending for a major. Scheffler got into the field by ranking in the OWGR top 50 before the March cutoff. He missed the U.S. Open at Winged Foot due to a positive COVID-19 test, so he should be champing at the bit to do well here.

Jordan Spieth (75-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 6/6

Best Career Finish: 1st (2015)

Top 5s: 4

Top 10s: 4

Top 25s: 6

Spieth has struggled with his ball striking for a couple of years, and constant tinkering with his swing has not helped, but his acumen on the greens has always seemed to bail him out. Spieth has not won in over three years, going back to the 2017 British Open. He had three majors to his credit before he turned 24. If there is a place for him to turn his career trajectory around, it would seem to be here, where he has never finished outside the top 25 and has a win, two runners-up and a third in just six appearances. Nevertheless, he is a mess off the tee, and it is starting to wear on him mentally. Last week in Houston is a perfect example: He led for much of the first round and then imploded to miss the cut. A player with the course record will generate solid interest, but bettors still might not be buying at the bottom yet on Spieth, who is clearly searching for any glimmer of hope to contend again.

Louis Oosthuizen (80-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 11/7

Best Career Finish: 2nd (2012)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 1

Top 25s: 5

Oosthuizen is always a popular pick at majors among sharp golf bettors because he is a major champion (2010 British Open) and one of seven players (Craig Wood, Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, Tom Watson, Greg Norman and Dustin Johnson) to have runner-up finishes in all four majors. His last win was in late 2018 at the South African Open in his homeland. He has been highly consistent to be ranked between 15th and 25th in the world, but the wins are infrequent enough that he always looks to be a good price in these events. Despite finishing second and losing a playoff to Bubba Watson at the 2012 Masters, he has not really contended at Augusta since. However, just when you think you can look past him, he contends in a big event like at the U.S. Open at Winged Foot, where he finished third. 

Paul Casey (80-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 13/9

Best Career Finish: T-4 (2016)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 5

Top 25s: 8

Casey has always had an under-the-radar good record at Augusta with five top-10s. He won twice in 2019 at the Valspar Championship and the Porsche European Open on the European Tour. Casey has had an excellent career with 20 worldwide professional wins, but he has just never been able to break through with a major victory. The closest he came was in August, when he finished T-2 at the PGA. He has been unable to build on that near-miss. The putter is always the question mark as he can stripe the irons with the best of them, but the flat stick often turns Paul Casey into Par Casey. 

Sungjae Im (125-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

No professional golfer on the planet is more active than Im, who played in 69 events in 2018 and ’19. Im, 22, won his first PGA Tour event in March at the Honda Classic and followed it up with a third at the Arnold Palmer Invitational. The break came at an inopportune time for Im, who was playing like a top-10 player in the world. He has posted only two top-10s since the restart. The talent is there, but he needs to prove himself with a strong finish in a major before you can jump in on him.

Matt Kuchar (125-1)

Best Career Finish: T-3 (2012)

Top 5s: 3

Top 10s: 4

Top 25s: 8

Kuchar and Lee Westwood are probably the best players in the world never to win a major when you consider longevity, as both are in their 40s. Kuchar returns for his 12th consecutive Masters, having finished in the top 12 last year. Kuchar has had a top-10 major finish in eight of the last 10 seasons, including four at the Masters. He already notched a win in 2020 with a victory at the Singapore Open on the Asian Tour and finished T-2 at the Genesis Invitational. However, he has not sniffed a top-10 since February. The career form is superb at Augusta National, but the current form leaves a lot to be desired. 

Phil Mickelson (125-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 27/24

Best Career Finish: 1st (2004, 2006, 2010)

Top 5s: 11

Top 10s: 15

Top 25s: 19

Mickelson has turned 50 and is 2-for-2 on the PGA Tour Champions, where his length can more than make up for his lack of driving accuracy. Mickelson knows how to approach and attack this course, and he still shows signs of life at places where he’s comfortable, as evidenced by his third at the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am and a T-2 at the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational. Even at 50, Mickelson cannot be totally ignored here, but it has been over five years since his runner-up in 2015. Bettors will likely take a shot at the three-time winner at such a big price, but he will need a vintage scrambling and putting performance to compensate for his dreadful form in terms of finding fairways.

Matthew Fitzpatrick (125-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 5/4

Best Career Finish: T-7 (2016)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 1

Top 25s: 2

Fitzpatrick makes his fifth straight appearance at the Masters due to his OWGR finishing in the top 50 last year. He is currently No. 20 in the world and has garnered six worldwide top-10 finishes in 2020. He turned pro at 19 and has a top-10 Masters finish to his credit with a T-7 in 2016. Fitzpatrick has five European Tour wins but did miss both cuts in the majors this summer. He finished T-21 here last year but came back after opening with a 78 to post a 67-68-70 and rally over the final three rounds. Fitzpatrick is not a big hitter but is one of the best putters and ball strikers in the world. He looks like a future major champion, but the future does not quite look to be now.

Francesco Molinari (125-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made:8/6

Best Career Finish: T-5 (2019)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 1

Top 25s: 3

Last year Molinari was leading the Masters on Sunday before his tee shot on the 12th went into Rae’s Creek. That led to a double bogey and brought the field, including eventual champion Tiger Woods, back into play. Ever since that poor shot he has failed to post a top-10 finish. He changed caddies this year, going with Justin Rose’s former bag man, Mark Fulcher, and had been dealing with a back injury that caused him to withdraw at Bay Hill. Molinari did not play for about eight months not only due to the pandemic but also the decision to move his family to California. He has played in only two events since February. A T-15 last weekend in Houston is at least something positive but not enough to go on with so little activity in 2020.

Shane Lowry (125-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 4/1

Best Career Finish: T-39 (2016)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

It is pretty rare to see a proven player who has a current major championship trophy — having won the 2019 British Open — at such a big price, but Lowry hasn’t shown much in four trips to Augusta. He has top-10 finishes at the U.S. Open (runner-up in 2016) and the PGA Championship, though. The Irishman won the Hong Kong Open in January but has been inconsistent ever since. A T-11 finish last weekend in Houston is a positive sign, but Lowry is not a proven commodity at Augusta National. 

Cameron Smith (125-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 3/3

Best Career Finish: T-5 (2018)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 1

Top 25s: 1

Smith enters this year’s field through his victory at the 2020 Sony Open in Hawaii. He also finished T-5 at the 2018 Masters. While he didn’t contend in any majors last season, he did make all four cuts and looks to be gaining confidence and slowly proving he belongs with the world’s elite. Smith showed he could do just that, albeit in match play, by defeating one of the world’s best, Justin Thomas, in Sunday singles last December at the Presidents Cup. Smith made both major championship cuts this summer after three missed cuts after the restart. But the Aussie has shown progressively good form since, and his finish of fourth last time out in the Zozo Championship at Sherwood is his best since the restart. This could be a potential sleeper at a big price. 

Cameron Champ (125-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

The long-hitting Champ’s victory in September at the Safeway Open garnered his entry into this year’s Masters. Champ is another youngster, at 24, who has tasted early success on the PGA Tour, but this will be his Augusta debut. He comes in off his best 2020 finish of T-8 in the Zozo Championship. However, the 2020 highlight is that he got his first taste of being in the mix on Sunday in a major at the PGA before falling to a T-10 finish. Champ is one of the bigger hitters on the tour, and his approach and short games have shown improvement. Contending here in his debut is likely too big of an ask, but his length alone could keep him in the mix for a top-10.

Jason Kokrak (125-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Kokrak finally broke his maiden on the PGA Tour in his ninth season with a victory in the CJ Cup at Shadow Creek. He already had a spot in this week’s field by finishing in the top 30 of the 2019 FedEx Cup standings and therefore making the Tour Championship. Aside from the victory in Las Vegas, Kokrak has six top-20 finishes in his last seven starts. He is one of the biggest hitters on the tour, and if the putting can stay true like it has done of late, Kokrak could emerge over the young guns like Morikawa, Wolff and Scheffler as the low rookie (10-1 current market average).

Marc Leishman (150-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 7/4

Best Career Finish: T-4 (2013)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 2

Top 25s: 2

Perhaps no player in the top 30 has struggled more in the second half of 2020 than Leishman. Before the stoppage in play, he won the Farmers Insurance Open, shooting 65 in the final round to overtake one of the world’s best in Jon Rahm. Leishman also had a runner-up finish this year at the Arnold Palmer Invitational, overcoming the toughest wind conditions on tour. However, his best finish since was a T-28 in a 30-player field at the Tour Championship. He has had a couple of good finishes here, most notably 2013, when he was the first-round leader and finished T-4. But the form is awful, and it would be a surprise to see him contend.

Gary Woodland (150-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 7/4

Best Career Finish: T-24 (2011)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 1

Woodland finally broke through as a world top-15 player with a major championship victory at the 2019 U.S. Open. However, he has dropped out of the top 30 and is in poor form. Woodland has been driving it poorly, which led to a missed cut at the U.S. Open followed by a 72nd-place finish in the CJ Cup and then a withdrawal the next week in the Zozo Championship. He has never contended at Augusta National and has shot some big numbers in the years that he has missed the cut. The game off the tee just is nowhere near where it should be, and he looks to be a player to fade this week. 

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Abraham Ancer (150-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: 1st Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Ancer emerged in 2017 with three runner-up finishes on the Korn Ferry Tour to earn his PGA Tour card. In 2018 he posted six top-10 finishes on the PGA Tour, but his first big tour win was on the PGA Tour of Australasia at the Emirates Australian Open. Ancer, who has dual Mexican and American citizenship, has continued to knock on the door for his first PGA Tour win with runners-up at the 2019 Northern Trust, the 2020 American Express and the 2020 RBC Heritage. Ancer is ranked No. 21 in the OWGR and earned his spot here by finishing in the top 30 of the 2019 FedEx Cup standings and reaching the Tour Championship. He looks to be a solid play for the top-10/20 markets and could have even more value for top debutant (12-1 on market average) behind Morikawa, Wolff, Scheffler, Im, Kokrak and Champ.

Kevin Kisner (150-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 4/4

Best Career Finish: T-21 (2019)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 1

Kisner has never contended here but has never missed the cut, either, and his form has gotten better with more course experience. He returns for his fifth Masters appearance by finishing top-30 in the FedEx Cup standings and making the Tour Championship. Kisner has finished in the top-25 in eight of his last 11 events and has broken 70 in three of his last six Augusta National rounds. Could be a sneaky contender and would certainly be worth plays in the top-10/20 markets.

Lee Westwood (165-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 18/15

Best Career Finish: 2nd (2010), T-2 (2016)

Top 5s: 3

Top 10s: 6

Top 25s: 10

Westwood won this year in Abu Dhabi and got back into the top 30 in the OWGR for the first time since 2014. He has 44 worldwide professional wins and is arguably the best player in terms of longevity to never win a major. Westwood has three runners-up, six thirds, 12 top-5s and 19 top-10s in majors, including two runners-up at Augusta. He finished T-13 at the U.S. Open, and perhaps the door has closed on winning a major, but he has a proven record here. Westwood had made nine straight cuts before missing out last weekend in Houston, but he had played four of five weeks in Europe so perhaps that can be excused. He returns to Augusta for the first time since 2017 but has finished in the top 20 in seven of his last eight Masters. 

Brandt Snedeker (200-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 11/8

Best Career Finish: T-3 (2018)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 3

Top 25s: 5

Snedeker has a decent record at Augusta and returns to the field having finished top-30 in the FedEx Cup standings and making the Tour Championship last year. He finished T-3 at the Farmers Insurance Open for his best finish in 16 months. Since that close call in San Diego, he has missed eight of 16 cuts, with his best finish a T-17 six weeks ago at the Sanderson Farms Championship. The putter has been better of late, but his ball striking has been out of sorts. On the precipice of turning 40, perhaps the door has closed on Snedeker contending in majors again. But this major has always been his best.

Erik van Rooyen (200-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Van Rooyen has opened eyes with some top finishes against some of the world’s best fields, with a T-8 at last year’s PGA Championship and a T-3 this year at the WGC Mexico. The South African had been knocking on the door for his first major tour win all last year with a couple of runner-up finishes before finally breaking through at the Scandinavian Invitational last summer in Sweden. He is in this field via finishing 2019 in the OWGR top 50. He made both major cuts this summer.

Billy Horschel (200-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 5/3

Best Career Finish: T-17 (2016)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 1

Horschel is a steady player and will appear in this year’s Masters due to his solid world ranking well inside the top 50. He should have won the Wyndham Championship in August but settled for a runner-up finish as the putter deserted him late Sunday. For a player of his talent and potential, he has rarely contended in majors. His only career top-5 in a major was a T-4 at the 2013 U.S. Open. 

Danny Willett (200-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 5/2

Best Career Finish: 1st (2016)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 1

Top 25s: 1

Willett won the Masters in 2016 in only his second Augusta appearance, but then his game fell off and he fell out of the top 100 in the world. He has been hit-or-miss the last two seasons and still misses his fair share of cuts. But when he hits, he hits big against top-quality fields. In 2018, he won the season-ending DP World Tour Championship on the European Tour in Dubai and then won the next year at the BMW PGA Championship. However, he has missed all three Augusta cuts since winning his green jacket and withdrew from the Houston Open last week citing a re-emergence of a wrist injury.

Brendon Todd (200-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 1/0

Best Career Finish: MC (2015)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Yips in Todd’s swing nearly caused him to quit the game. He missed 37 of 41 cuts from 2016-18. At the end of 2018, he ranked No. 2,006 in the world. Nevertheless, he went back to the Korn Ferry Tour and regained his PGA Tour card. After missing his first four cuts back on the tour, he followed with a T-28 in Houston that propelled him to become the best comeback story in golf in 2019. Todd won back-to-back starts at the Bermuda Championship and the Mayakoba Golf Classic and went from No. 522 in the world to finishing 2019 at No. 63. While Todd has emerged from the abyss, he still is unproven against the top players in the top fields, though he has made the cuts in both majors this summer.

Matt Wallace (200-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 1/0

Best Career Finish: MC (2019)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Last year was supposed to be Wallace’s breakout year after he won three times on the European Tour in 2018. He has a spot in this field via finishing in the top 4 at the 2019 PGA Championship. Wallace had a solid year last season but did not quite live up to expectations with the step up in class to play against the world’s elite players week in and week out. Wallace has made 11 of his last 12 cuts and has shown flashes with a runner-up several weeks ago at the Scottish Championship and a T-4 in tougher conditions at the Memorial this summer. Muirfield Village is a Jack Nicklaus design inspired by Augusta, so he could be an under-the-radar top-10/20 player in the props market.

Sebastian Munoz (200-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Munoz qualified for this field by defeating Sungjae Im in a playoff at the Sanderson Farms Championship in September 2019. The Colombian has made nine straight cuts since missing the cut at the PGA, including three top-10s in stronger fields and five top-20s. The ball striking has shown steady improvement of late to match his putting. A top-20 certainly is not out of the question.

Si Woo Kim (200-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 3/2

Best Career Finish: T-21 (2019)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 2

The South Korean is in this field on his third and final year of his exemption for winning the 2017 Players Championship, which is his last PGA Tour win. He was worked back into the OWGR top 100 with some solid finishes of late (T-3 Wyndham Championship, T-8 Shriners Hospitals for Children Open) and was T-13 at the PGA. Kim switched coaches to Claude Harmon and his game has shown signs of life. He is always a boom-or-bust candidate, but a top-20 would not surprise here at a decent price.

Henrik Stenson (250-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 14/10

Best Career Finish: T-5 (2018)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 1

Top 25s: 7

Stenson has a recent win to his credit, having taken the Hero World Challenge in late December, but he has not exactly been in top form lately. He is in this field on the exemption for winning the 2016 British Open. Stenson has multiple top-5s and top-10s in every major apart from the Masters. His T-5 in 2018 at Augusta is his only top-10 finish in 14 appearances. Nevertheless, the Swede has been out of form as he withdrew after a bad start in Bermuda and has made only one cut in nearly four months. 

Ian Poulter (250-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 14/13

Best Career Finish: T-6 (2015)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 3

Top 25s: 8

Poulter returns to Augusta by finishing in the top 12 in last year’s tournament. While he has never had any close calls at the Masters, he has a solid under-the-radar record and has missed the cut just once. Two years ago, Poulter finally won his first standalone PGA Tour event at the 2018 Houston Open. He has won a couple of WGC events and is firmly entrenched as a European Ryder Cup legend, but the one thing he has yet to accomplish is to really knock on the door at a major. Poulter withdrew before last week’s Houston Open with back problems but has three solid outings (T-6 Scottish Open, fifth BMW PGA Championship, T-12 CJ Cup at Shadow Creek) coming in. The injury is of concern, but he has proven to be a solid top-20 player with eight top-25s in 14 appearances here.

Lanto Griffin (250-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Griffin regained his PGA Tour card in 2019 with a win on the Korn Ferry Tour, finished sixth on the regular-season money list and hit the ground running immediately. After starting with four top-20 finishes last fall, Griffin won his first PGA Tour event at the Houston Open. He continued with solid form at the start of 2020 with two top-10 finishes (T-7 Sony Open in Hawaii, T-9 AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am). Griffin has made the cut (T-19 PGA; T-43 U.S. Open) in his first two major appearances. He also did well against two high-quality fields with a T-7 at the CJ Cup at Shadow Creek and a T-11 at the Zozo Championship at Sherwood. Griffin could be a sneaky top-10/20 prop play.

Max Homa (300-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

One of golf’s best tweeters got into this field by gaining his maiden win at the 2019 Wells Fargo Championship. Before the break in play, Homa was in good form with four top-10 finishes in his last eight events dating to the Japan Tour’s Dunlop Phoenix event last November. He garnered three top-10s (Farmers Insurance Open, Waste Management Phoenix Open, Genesis Invitational) against some high-end fields. However, other than a T-3 in a weaker field at the 3M Open, Homa has really struggled since the restart and has missed eight of 14 cuts.

Zach Johnson (300-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 15/9

Best Career Finish: 1st (2007)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 2

Top 25s: 3

Johnson won the 2007 Masters with a score of 1-over-par 289 in very windy conditions and joined Sam Snead in 1954 and Jack Burke Jr. in 1956 as the only men to win the green jacket with an over-par score. His last victory was in 2015 at the British Open, and his last top-5 finish was in 2017 at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational. Since that ’07 Augusta win, Johnson has never really contended again here, but he did post a top-10 a couple of months ago at the Wyndham Championship and a surprising T-8 finish at the U.S. Open. At this stage of his career, he is better when the conditions get tougher, and the rain and wind in the forecast could be a welcome sight.

Bernd Wiesberger (350-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 4/4

Best Career Finish: T-22 (2015)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 2

While Brendon Todd was the comeback kid stateside, Wiesberger was the comeback player of the year across the pond with three European Tour wins (Made in Denmark, Scottish Open, Italian Open). He finished 2019 ranked No. 22 in the world and well inside the OWGR top 50. The season has been ho-hum for the Austrian, and the cancellation of the Ryder Cup was a disappointment, considering he was poised to make the team for the first time. Wiesberger made both major championship cuts this summer and is 4-for-4 at Augusta. 

Christiaan Bezuidenhout (350-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

The 25-year-old South African earned a spot in the field with an OWGR top 50 ranking in March. He started 2020 with continued solid play with a runner-up at the Dubai Desert Classic and a victory at the Dimension Data Pro-Am on the Sunshine Tour on home soil. Bezuidenhout has been playing more frequently in the U.S. this year but has never really shown signs of contention. He is a proven winner on tough courses such as Valderrama last year, so he could find his way to a top-20 finish if the weather is more difficult this weekend.

Corey Conners (350-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 2/1

Best Career Finish: T-46 (2019)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Conners earned the final spot in last year’s Masters field by not only winning the Valero Texas Open the week before but winning a six-man playoff during Monday qualifying just to get into that tournament. He is in this year’s field due to finishing in the FedEx Cup top 30 and reaching the Tour Championship. Conners is one of the PGA Tour’s best ball strikers but has yet to solve his struggles on the greens. His T-8 in the Zozo Championship at Sherwood three weeks ago is his highlight of 2020. He missed the cut in both majors this summer.

Chez Reavie (350-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 4/1

Best Career Finish: 53rd (2018)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Reavie earned his spot in this field by finishing in the top 4 at last year’s U.S. Open at Pebble Beach and then went across the country to win the Travelers Championship in Connecticut the next week. That was Reavie’s first PGA Tour victory since the 2008 RBC Canadian Open. He went on to finish T-5 at the Tour Championship and T-10 at the Genesis Invitational against high-quality fields. Although he is one of the more accurate hitters on tour, he has struggled with his short game and has clearly fallen from his summer 2019 form. 

Victor Perez (350-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Perez will be a Masters debutant this year who earned his first major professional victory last September at the Alfred Dunhill Links Championship on the European Tour and received the Masters invite via an OWGR top-50 ranking. The Frenchman continued that form with a T-4 in his first WGC event at the WGC Champions in China. He followed that with T-2 finishes at the Turkish Airlines Open and the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship. Perez also finished runner-up at the BMW PGA Championship in England this summer as well as a respectable T-22 in his major debut at the PGA Championship. He has J.P. Fitzgerald on the bag, who was with Rory McIlroy for all four of his major wins, and that should help a young and talented yet inexperienced player.

Dylan Frittelli (350-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 1/0

Best Career Finish: MC (2018)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

The South African earned his invite by winning the 2019 John Deere Classic in July. A T-8 at the RBC Heritage is his lone top-10 in 2020. He is a good driver, but the approach game can be highly shaky. 

J.T. Poston (350-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Poston is in this field by virtue of his maiden victory at the Wyndham Championship in August 2019. During that week, Poston became the first player since 1974 to win a PGA Tour event while going bogey-free. He finished T-3 at the Sanderson Farms Championship a few weeks ago and has three top-10s since the June restart. Poston has shown better form of late, but he can be erratic off the tee.

Byeong Hun An (400-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 3/1

Best Career Finish: T-33 (2017)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Nicknamed Ben, he looked destined to be a star when he became the youngest winner of the U.S. Amateur in 2009 at 17. However, he has only one win time on a major tour, the 2015 BMW Championship on the European Tour. An started playing some of his best golf in the last few years late last summer and had six top-10 finishes from August 2019-March 2020. This form has propelled him back into the OWGR top 50 to get him back into the Masters field for the first time since 2017. His two top-10s in 2020 came before the stoppage in play. Although An has been working with putting guru Brad Faxon, the flat stick remains the worst club in his bag, and that could prove disastrous on faster greens this week.

Charles Howell III (400-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 9/6

Best Career Finish: T-13 (2004)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 2

The Masters always holds a special meaning for Howell, especially since he was born and raised in Augusta, Ga., and is a member of the Augusta Country Club, which is adjacent to Amen Corner. Howell returned last year to Augusta National for the first time in seven years with a T-32 finish. He earned a spot in this year’s field by finishing in the top 30 of the FedEx Cup standings and reaching the Tour Championship. His 2020 highlight was a T-3 at the 3M Open. Perhaps the putter carries him through to the weekend, but hard to expect much more than that. 

Charl Schwartzel (400-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 10/6

Best Career Finish: 1st (2011)

Top 5s: 2

Top 10s: 2

Top 25s: 3

Schwartzel won the Masters in 2011 with four closing birdies and finished that year as a top-10 player in the world. He stayed in the top-40 for several seasons but now is ranked in the 200s. His game has slipped but he also missed several months in 2019 with a wrist injury and played only 12 events last year. He returned to play late last season and struggled but did show some signs of life with a T-5 finish at Pebble Beach and then a solid T-17 at the Honda Classic. This summer’s highlight was a T-3 at the 3M Open, but not much else.

Kevin Na (400-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 8/5

Best Career Finish: T-12 (2012, 2015)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 2

Na is coming off his career year last season with wins  at the Charles Schwab Challenge at Colonial and the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open. He seems in a better place mentally with the birth of his second child last summer. Na’s struggles at times have been what can go on between the ears, so to speak. He has only two top-10s in majors in his career and missed the cut at the U.S. Open. He also has two top-10s this summer at the Travelers and Memorial. His putter can get hot at any time, so he could be a sneaky top-10/20 player.

Adam Hadwin (400-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 2/2

Best Career Finish: T-24 (2018)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 1

The Canadian was not in the field last year but returns this time as he was No. 50 in the OWGR at the end of 2019 and the top-50 is the cutoff for the invite. His runner-up finish at the Safeway Open and a T-4 at the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open in Las Vegas late last fall essentially clinched his spot in the top-50. Hadwin is not in peak form with only one top-10 this year, with a fourth at the Rocket Mortgage Classic. But he has made the cut here in both appearances. 

Rafael Cabrera-Bello (500-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 4/3

Best Career Finish: T-17 (2016)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 1

Cabrera-Bello will make his fifth straight appearance at the Masters via finishing in the top 50 of the OWGR for 2019. Last season was a down year for the Spaniard, who slipped from inside the top 30 to just outside the top 40. His last victory was the 2017 Scottish Open. It has been over a year since he has posted a top-10 in any worldwide event.

Justin Harding (500-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 1/1

Best Career Finish: T-12 (2019)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 1

Harding returns to Augusta by virtue of finishing T-12 here last year after opening with 69-69 on debut. The top-12 finishers and ties are invited back to the Masters the next year. The South African has two thirds on the European Tour this summer at the British Masters and Andalucia Masters. He can get the putter rolling from deep and does hit a lot of fairways, so it would not surprise to see him make the cut again.

Tyler Duncan (500-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Duncan earned his invite by winning his first career PGA Tour event last November at the RSM Classic in a playoff over Webb Simpson. He has been active since the restart and has made 12 of 16 cuts, including a respectable T-34 at the U.S. Open. 

Graeme McDowell (750-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 9/3

Best Career Finish: T-12 (2012)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 2

McDowell got into the field by being in the OWGR top 50 before the cutoff in March. He won this year at the Saudi International on the European Tour and earned a victory on the PGA Tour last season at the Corales Puntacana Championship in the Dominican Republic, but that was an alternate tour event that doesn't provide a Masters invitation to the winner. McDowell has never really had the game to fit Augusta.

Andrew Landry (750-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 1/1

Best Career Finish: T-46 (2019)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Landry returns to the Masters this year after having locked in his spot with a win in January at the American Express in Palm Springs, Calif. 

Nate Lashley (750-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Lashley failed to make the field of the 2019 Rocket Mortgage Classic in Monday qualifying last June but gained entry as an alternate and was the last man in the tournament. He made the most of his opportunity by winning the tournament by six strokes. That victory not only got him his PGA Tour card but a spot in the Masters. He has had some glimmers of good play since that win with T-3s at the Greenbrier and this year at the Waste Management Phoenix Open. Lashley also finished T-4 several weeks ago at the Corales Puntacana in the Dominican Republic. 

Nick Taylor (750-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

The Canadian earned his first Masters invite with a wire-to-wire win in February at the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am. However, he has made only six of 12 cuts since. 

Shugo Imahira (750-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 1/0

Best Career Finish: MC (2019)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Imahira missed out on the top 50 for last year’s Masters but ended up being extended an invitation anyway before a missed cut. Imahira is back, but this time he finished the year ranked in the OWGR top 50 due to his two wins on the Japan Tour. He just made his first cut in a major at Winged Foot and finished 61st at the U.S. Open. 

Sung Kang (750-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Kang earned entry into the Masters with his maiden PGA Tour victory at the AT&T Byron Nelson in May 2019. The next week he finished T-7 at the PGA Championship at Bethpage Black, which was his best career major finish. His best finish of 2020 is a T-2nd at the Genesis Invitational, but he has missed 10 of 22 cuts this season.

Andrew Putnam (750-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Putnam made the Masters field by finishing inside the OWGR top 50 at the end of 2019. His lone PGA Tour win is at the 2018 Barracuda Championship. He has made only eight cuts in 18 events in 2020. His T-21st finish in Bermuda two weeks ago was his best finish since a T-10th at the American Express in January.  

Lucas Glover (750-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 7/4

Best Career Finish: T-20 (2007)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 1

Glover hasn’t been to the winner’s circle since the 2011 Wells Fargo Championship, but he did have a bit of a comeback year with seven top-10 finishes last season. The 2009 U.S. Open champion earned his invite by being one of the top 30 players in the FedExCup standings and making the 2019 Tour Championship field. His more recent form is not as encouraging, considering he has made only 10 of 19 cuts in 2020, with his best finish a T-17 at the U.S. Open.

Andy Ogletree (a) (750-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Ogletree is a senior at Georgia Tech and earned his invitation by winning the 2019 U.S. Amateur. He is currently the No. 12 amateur in the world. He was also a member of the winning 2019 Walker Cup team. Ogletree shot 71-77 to miss the cut by two shots at the U.S. Open. He also received invites this summer to the Colonial, the RBC Heritage and the Memorial, but he missed the cut in all three events.

Jazz Janewattananond (1,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

The 24-year-old from Thailand will make his first Masters appearance due to finishing in the OWGR top 50 to conclude 2019. Janewattananond won back-to-back events in December on the Asian Tour in Indonesia and in his homeland. Last year was his breakthrough, as he won four events on the Asian Tour. Janewattananond does not have a ton of experience in majors but was T-2 last year at the PGA Championship after 54 holes before the difficult Sunday conditions took him out of contention. He was as high as 38th in the world this year but has fallen to 73rd. 

Jimmy Walker (1,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 6/6

Best Career Finish: T-8 (2014)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 1

Top 25s: 3

Walker has a spot here due to his 2016 PGA Championship win. That triumph was Walker’s last, as he contracted Lyme disease in April 2017 and has been unable to find that championship form since. Nevertheless, he has never missed the cut here in six tries. However, he has made only two cuts in 10 events since the restart.

C.T. Pan (1,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Pan earned his spot in this field by notching his maiden PGA Tour victory at the 2019 RBC Heritage. Pan has made six straight cuts on the PGA Tour coming in, but his best finish was a T-12th at the Sanderson Farms Championship. He lacks the power off the tee to compete here. 

Vijay Singh (2,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 26/19

Best Career Finish: 1st (2000)

Top 5s: 2

Top 10s: 6

Top 25s: 11

Singh has made the cut here in six of the last eight years since reaching 50. He still plays a hodgepodge schedule of events on the PGA Tour and PGA Tour Champions and is certainly still competitive on the latter tour even at 57, but he has not shot under 70 in the last decade here. 

Fred Couples (2,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 34/30

Best Career Finish: 1st (1992)

Top 5s: 5

Top 10s: 11

Top 25s: 20

Couples is now 61 but has maintained particularly good form, having made seven of his last nine cuts here with six top-20 finishes. He still plays on the PGA Tour Champions and posted two runner-up finishes in the early part of 2020 but has cut back his playing schedule. 

Bernhard Langer (2,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 36/26

Best Career Finish: 1st (1985, 1993)

Top 5s: 3

Top 10s: 9

Top 25s: 15

The two-time green jacket winner has made the cut here three of the last four years. He continues to win tournaments even at 63 with three PGA Tour Champions wins in the last 24 months, including the Senior Open last summer, which was his record 11th PGA Tour Champions major victory. 

Abel Gallegos (a) (3,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Gallegos, 18, is a big 6-foot-3 youngster from Argentina who earned his invite by winning the Latin America Amateur Championship in January. 

John Augenstein (a) (3,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Augenstein is a senior at Vanderbilt and earned a Masters invite as the runner-up at the 2019 U.S. Amateur. He was also a member of the victorious U.S. Walker Cup team last year. Augenstein shot 74-75 and missed the cut at the U.S. Open in September.

James Sugrue (a) (3,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

The Irishman won the British Amateur Championship last June. Only two winners of that event, Matteo Manassero in 2009 and Romain Langasque in 2015, have made the cut at Augusta in this century. Sugrue was a member of last year’s Great Britain/Ireland Walker Cup team. Sugrue shot 78-79 to miss the cut at the U.S. Open and finished 66th in the Irish Open the next week. 

 Lukas Michel (a) (3,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 0/0

Best Career Finish: First Masters Appearance

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Last September, Michel became the first foreign-born player to win the U.S. Mid-Amateur Championship, which is for amateurs 25 or older. The Aussie has kept his amateur status to compete here. Michel played in the U.S. Open last month but shot 80-77 and missed the cut. 

Yuxin Lin (a) (3,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 1/0

Best Career Finish: MC (2018)

Top 5s: 0

Top 10s: 0

Top 25s: 0

Yuxin, a 19-year-old amateur from China, will be making his second Masters appearance in three years due to winning the Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship for a second time. 

Mike Weir (3,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 20/11

Best Career Finish: 1st (2003)

Top 5s: 2

Top 10s: 2

Top 25s: 6

Weir won the Masters in 2003 and remains the only Canadian to win a major. He just turned 50 in May and has done well of late on the PGA Tour Champions with three top-10s in nine starts. He was the 36-hole leader at the Dominion Energy Charity Classic last month before settling for second behind Phil Mickelson.

Trevor Immelman (5,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 17/10

Best Career Finish: 1st (2008)

Top 5s: 2

Top 10s: 2

Top 25s: 5

The 2008 champion hasn’t played in 2020 and has been transitioning to television as part of CBS’ PGA Tour coverage.

Jose Maria Olazabal (5,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 30/18

Best Career Finish: 1st (1994, 1999)

Top 5s: 5

Top 10s: 8

Top 25s: 13

The two-time green jacket winner last made the cut here in 2014. Only two of his last 26 rounds here have been under par. 

Larry Mize (8,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 36/20

Best Career Finish: 1st (1987)

Top 5s: 2

Top 10s: 3

Top 25s: 11

At 62, the 1987 champion is the only player to win the Masters who was born in Augusta. He did make back-to-back cuts in 2016-17 but has made only three cuts in the last 10 years. 

Sandy Lyle (8,000-1)

Total Appearances/Cuts Made: 38/17

Best Career Finish: 1st (1988)

Top 5s: 1

Top 10s: 1

Top 25s: 6

The 62-year-old Lyle was the 1988 Masters champion and won the par-3 contest at Augusta last year. But he has not made the Masters cut since 2014.

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